Making History Meaningful: the Power of Narrative and Historical Thinking

Because story is such a powerful device for making meaning, it has been called a teacher's best asset. The inherent structure of a story with causal links and elements of puzzle make it an important tool to weave the disparate threads of people and events into a memorable and engaging tapestry. However, as our population becomes increasingly more diverse and previously silenced people demand a voice, students are faced with a cacophony of stories often competing ones. In history class students should answer the question "What's the story?" but also answer, "What other stories are there? Why should I believe this story? Why tell this story?" This workshop will give strategies to harness the power of narrative to the curricular competencies to help students navigate a world of multiple stories and contribute using their own voices to democratic discussion. Participants will receive a copy of one of Nelson Education's new textbooks

Target Audience

grades 6 to 10 social studies

Sessions

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Room Bandroom

This session is full.

1:15 PM - 2:45 PM
Room Bandroom

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Presenter

  • Tom Morton

    Tom Morton taught for more than thirty years in Kabala, Montréal and Vancouver. During that time he received the Social Studies Teachers’ Association Teacher of the Year award, the Kron Award for Excellence in Holocaust Education, and the Governor-General’s Award for Excellence in Teaching Canadian History. With Peter Seixas he is co-author of The Big Six Historical Thinking Concepts (Nelson) and the author of Co-operative Learning and Social Studies: Towards Excellence and Equity (Kagan). He continues to give professional development presentations and write textbooks and website content for museums and Nelson Education.