Using Student-Designed Websites to Transform "Assessment" into "Advocacy."

This workshop will introduce participants to website-design as a tool of assessment where students can publish their research and share their reflections on their learning with a wider audience.  This encourages to think of their learning in the different way, from "What did I learn?" to "Why does this matter?" and "How do I communicate this to someone else?"

Participants will receive a demonstration of the applications of the Weebly website builder in having students co-design a website, using an example of a project designed for a "BC First Peoples 12" class.  Using Weebly's "Co-Editor" feature, the students co-designed a website to demonstrate their understanding and analysis of assigned chapters from 21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act, by Bob Joseph.  Once the website was finished, it was shared with school and wider community as an act of "allyship"  

Materials and instructions for this project (which can be easily adapted to other topics) will be shared with workshop participants.

Target Audience

Secondary

Sessions

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Secure your spot now.

 Add To My Workshops

Presenter

  • Sarah Miller

    I am currently the English Department Coodinator and teach Secondary English and Social Studies at Khalsa Secondary School, an independent Sikh school located on the traditional and unceded territories of the Semiahmoo, Katzie, Kwikwetlem, Kwantlen, Musqueam, Qayqayt, Tsleil-Waututh, and Tsawwassen First Nations in Surrey, BC.  Prior to assuming my teaching post at Khalsa Secondary, I taught for three years at Lach Klan School, an independent First Nations School in the village of Kitkatla (located outside of Prince Rupert and on the traditional and unceded territories of the Gitxaala people).  I have my Bachelor of Arts: English from the University of Victoria, by Bachelor of Education: Secondary Education from the University of British Columbia, and I am currently undertaking my graduate studies at the University of British Columbia by pursuing a Masters Degree in Education: Social Studies Education.

    Website